Friday, March 16, 2018

Human Rights as a Foundation for Practice-Susan Maret,PhD

Susan Maret,PhD

IFLA -- Postcard Article 19

in one way or another, human rights frameworks concern information and knowledge as essential components of human dignity, self-determination, freedom of expression, and security.--Susan Maret,PhD.

"Access to archives and libraries are an integral part of human rights as information rights" writes Susan Maret*  at  SPEAK UP! Run by IFLA’s FAIFE Committee, for sharing ideas and exploring how the work of libraries is shaped by, and can promote, human rights around the world. 

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Neutrality and the People- ALA President's Program- Midwinter Conference-2018

Neutrality and the People

Background Reading  (Chrono order)-- compiled by ALA President's Program Panelist, 
Kathleen de la Peña McCook.

Jack London (1903). People of the Abyss.

Civilization has made possible all manner of creature comforts and heart's delights. In these the average Englishman does not participate. If he shall be forever unable to participate, then Civilization falls. There is no reason for the continued existence of an artifice so avowed a failure. But it is impossible that men should have reared this tremendous artifice in vain. It stuns the intellect. To acknowledge so crushing a defeat is to give the death-blow to striving and progress. (ch. 27

(Thank you Roy Tennant for digitizing this collection). 

Frank Adams, with Myles Horton (1973).  Unearthing Seeds of Fire: The Idea of Highlander.

Highlander serves as a catalyst for grassroots organizing and movement building in Appalachia and the South. We work with people fighting for justice, equality and sustainability, supporting their efforts to take collective action to shape their own destiny. Through popular education, language justice, participatory research, cultural work, and intergenerational organizing, we help create spaces — at Highlander and in local communities — where people gain knowledge, hope and courage, expanding their ideas of what is possible.

Sanford Berman (2005). “Classism in the Stacks: Libraries and Poverty.” American Library Association. 

William T. Vollmann (2007). Poor People. Eco.
             “Because I wish to respect poor people's perceptions and experiences, I refuse to say that I know their good better than they; accordingly I further refuse to condescend to them  with the pity that either pretends they have no choices at all, or else, worse yet, gilds Their every choice with my benevolent approval." (P.170)

James J. Lorence (2011) The Unemployed People's Movement: Leftists, Liberals, and Labor in Georgia, 1929-1941. Athens: University of Georgia Press.

Martha C. Nussbaum (2011).  Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Gerald W. McEntee and Lee Saunders (2012). The Main Street Moment: Fighting Back to Save the American Dream. New York: Nation Books.

Matthew Desmond (2016). Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. New York: Crown.

Kathryn J. Edin, and H. Luke Shaefer. (2016). $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America. Boston: Mariner.

Sarah Jones (2016). “Liberals Should Try Not Having So Much Contempt for the Poor.” New Republic, December 13.

Sam Quinones (2016). Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic. New York: Bloomsbury.

Brian  Alexander. (2017). Glass House: The 1% Economy and the Shattering of the All-American Town. New York: St. Martin’s.

Lauren Barack (2017) "Librarians Reach Out To Dreamers." School Library Journal 63 (October): 18.   

Jenny Bossaller (2017).  "Alternatives to Apathy and Indifference: Civic Education in Public Libraries." Library Quarterly 87 (July): 195-210.

Michael Dowling (2017) "Project Welcome: Libraries planning for resettlement and integration of refugees." American Libraries 48, (September 2): 24-26.

Kathleen de la Peña McCook (2017). "From the One-Mule Tenant Farmer to the Hillbilly Highway: How Librarians Can Support the White Working Class," The Library Quarterly 87 (July):  257-267.

ALA President's Program

Panel Discussion
Date:Sunday, February 11, 2018 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

American Library Association President, Jim Neal February 2018

Are Libraries Neutral?

Have They Ever Been?    .   Should They Be?  

The question of neutrality in librarianship is an old one.  ALA’s 1939 Code of Ethics for Librarians calls for unbiased “recommendations”.  This is seen in the ALA Library Bill of Rights principles that present the library as content neutral, open and accessible to all. We will explore the following questions with the aim of challenging our thinking and practices:
  • Were libraries ever neutral?
  • Has the time come to question neutrality?
  • Are libraries through their practices, collections, services and technologies able to be neutral?
  • Can libraries be neutral as part of societies and systems that are not neutral?
  • Rather than neutral, should we advocate for a distinct set of values?
  • How can we do so and maintain trust in our communities?
A group of ALA members from academic library, public library, and library education backgrounds engage the issues.  A formal debate, with two speakers in the affirmative and two in the negative, followed by commentary from a reactor panel and a conversation with attendees, moderated by ALA President, Jim Neal.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Digital Curation of the The Archivo Histórico de la Policía Nacional (Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive, AHPN)

How can we process 80 million pages of historical documents?

The Archivo Histórico de la Policía Nacional (Guatemalan National Police Historical Archive, AHPN)..
 In 2010, the University of Texas at Austin partnered with the AHPN to build an online portal to a digital version of the archive.

Monday, January 22, 2018

Coming to America Who Should We Welcome, What Should We Do?

FREE Materials and Online Training
The immigration issue affects virtually every American, directly or indirectly, often in deeply personal ways. This guide is designed to help people deliberate together about how we should approach the issue. The three options presented here reflect different ways of understanding what is at stake and force us to think about what matters most to us when we face difficult problems that involve all of us and that do not have perfect solutions.

The issue raises a number of difficult questions, and there are no easy answers:

Should we strictly enforce the law and deport people who are here without permission, or would deporting millions of people outweigh their crime?

Should we welcome more newcomers to build a more vibrant and diverse society, or does this pose too great a threat to national unity?

Should we accept more of the growing numbers of refugees from war-torn regions, or should we avoid the risk of allowing in people whose backgrounds may not have been fully checked?

Should our priority be to help immigrants assimilate into our distinctively American way of life, including learning English, or should we instead celebrate a growing mosaic of different peoples?

The concerns that underlie this issue are not confined to party affiliation, nor are they captured by labels like “conservative” or “liberal.”

The research involved in developing the guide included interviews and conversations with Americans from all walks of life, as well as surveys of nonpartisan public-opinion research, subject-matter scans, and reviews of initial drafts by people with direct experience with the subject.
This issue guide presents the following three options for deliberation:
Option 1: Welcome Immigrants, Be a Beacon of Freedom
This option says that immigration has helped make America what it is today- a dynamic and diverse culture, an engine of the global economy, and a beacon of freedom around the world.
Option 2: Enforce the Law, Be Fair to Those Who Follow the Rules
This option says we need a fair system, where the rules are clear and, above all, enforced. With an estimated 11 million people living in the country illegally, our current system is unjust and uncontrolled. 
Option 3: Slow Down and Rebuild Our Common Bonds
This option recognizes that newcomers have strengthened American culture in the past. But the current levels of immigration are so high, and the country is now so diverse, that we must regain our sense of national purpose and identity.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Human Rights Watch’s 28th annual review of human rights practices around the globe.

World Report 2018 is Human Rights Watch’s 28th annual review of human rights practices around the globe. It summarizes key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide, drawing on events from late 2016 through November 2017.

[if link does not work go directly to the Human Rights Watch website & download].

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Librarians & Human Rights-Resources & Readings

Librarians and Human Rights: A Seminar
University of South Florida, School of Information


Taught by Kathleen de la Peña McCook.
Research support by Shawn A.P. Ohtani

Description: Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Dignity and Justice for All of Us
Each December 10 as the world celebrates Human Rights Day, the anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the world community builds solidarity and a unified vision.
Human rights, the assumption that all human beings deserve certain rights and dignity by virtue of their human existence, are most eloquently defined in the preamble of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
“Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world. [United Nations. (1948) Universal Declaration of Human Rights.]
The aim of the Seminar, Librarians and Human Rights, is to present a historical and cultural analysis of the role of librarians vis-à-vis human rights as defined by the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The course  highlights the stated goals of the profession and the work librarians must do to achieve a more equitable society in the United States and a compassionate nation among others.

Readings and Resources:
Abilock, D. (May/June 2006). "So Close and So Small: Six Promising Approaches to Civic Education, Equity, and Social Justice." Knowledge Quest v. 34 no. 5: p. 9-16.
American Library Association Policy Manual: “Article 19 of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights." (Section 58.4.)
Anaeme, F. O. (2012). Reducing Gender Discrimination and Violence against Women through Library and Information Services. Library Philosophy & Practice, 50-55.
Battista, A., Ellenwood, D., Gregory, L., Higgins, S., Lilburn, J., Harker, Y. S., & Sweet, C. (2015). Seeking Social Justice In The ACRL Framework. Communications In Information Literacy, 9(2), 111-125.
Bell, C. J. (2006). "Libraries and Human Rights Education." Catholic Library World v. 77 no. 2: p. 130-138.
Berman, S. (2006). Classism in the Stacks: Libraries and Poverty. 2005 Jean E. Coleman Library Outreach Lecture; American Library Association.

Birdsall, W.F. (Winter 2006-2007). "A Progressive Librarianship for the 21st Century." Progressive Librarian v. 28: p. 49-63
Britz, J., Hoffmann, A., Ponelis, S., Zimmer, M., & Lor, P. (2013). On considering the application of Amartya Sen's capability approach to an information-based rights framework. Information Development, 29(2), 106-113.
Britz, J. J. (May 2008) “Making the global information society good: A social justice perspective on the ethical dimensions of the global information society.” Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology v.59 no. 7, p.1171-1183.
Budd, J.M. (Summer 2006). "Discourse Analysis and the Study of Communication in LIS." Library Trends v. 55: p. 65-82
Buschman, J. (2012). Information Rights, Human Rights, And Political Rights: A Précis On Intellectual And Contextual Issues For Library And Information Science. Progressive Librarian, 17-24.
Buschman, J. (2003). Dismantling the Public Sphere: Situating and Sustaining Librarianship in the Age of the New Public Philosophy. Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited.
Buschman,J.(1998). History and Theory of Information Poverty.” In K. M. Venturella (Ed.), Poor People and Library Services. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland Publishers, 16-34. 
Buschman, J., M. Rosenzweig, and E. Harger. (June 1994). "The Clear Imperative for Involvement: Librarians Must Address Social Issues." American Libraries v. 25: p. 575-576.
Carbo, T. (2013). Information Science & Technology and Human Rights: ASIS&T's Participation in the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition*. Bulletin Of The American Society For Information Science & Technology40(1), 10-12.
Civallero, E. (2007). When Memory Turns into Ashes ... Memoricide During the XX Century. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Clement, E., and Cullingford, A. (2007). A Library for Peace: the Commonweal Collection. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Collins, C. (2007). Disseminating Truth to Power - Human Rights, Information and the Internet as Court of Last/Only Resort. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Deschamps, C. (2009). IFLA, Human Rights, and Social Responsibility. IFLA Journal, 35(1), 5-6.

Edwards, J. B., Robinson, M. S., & Unger, K. R. (2013). Transforming libraries, building communities: The community-centered library. Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2013.
introduction (Links to an external site.) to Beyond Article 19: Libraries and Social and Cultural Rights (Links to an external site.)  We know about Article 19  as a fundamental support for intellectual freedom, but there is less attention in the library world given to Article 27, about cultural  rights. The book explores Article 27 and cultural rights in relation to  libraries.

Description: Encyclopedia of Human Rights

Encyclopedia of Human Rights, Forsythe, D. P. (2009).. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Five volumes- edited by David Forsythe, offers comprehensive coverage of all aspects of human rights theory, practice, law, and history in over 300 entries signed by leading scholars and human rights experts. The coverage includes major figures, organizations and institutions, human rights events and crises, and human rights norms.

An Encyclopedia of Human Rights in the United States, 2nd ed. (2011). (see review in Reference & User Services Quarterly, 51(2), 195-196.

Forsyth, E. (2005). "Public Libraries and the Millennium Development Goals." IFLA Journal v. 31 no. 4: p. 315-23.
Forsythe, D. P. (2009). Encyclopedia of human rights. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Gehner, John 'Libraries, Low-Income People, and Social Exclusion', Public Library Quarterly (Links to an external site.) 29 (Jan. 2010)1, 39 - 47.
Hauptman, R. (2002). Ethics and Librarianship. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland.
Horton, M., and P. Freire. (1990). We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.
Hayden, Carla D. (2003) “Presidential Initiative: Equity of Access” as quoted in Osborne, R., (2004). From outreach to equity: Innovative models of library policy and practice, p.xi Chicago: American Library Association.
Hayden, C. D. (2004). The Equity Struggle Must Continue. American Libraries, 35(6), 5.
Hayden, C. D. (2004). Libraries Matter Because People Believe In Them. American Libraries, 35(1), 5.

HUMANRIGHTS.GOV. U.S. Dept. of State. is the official United States Government (USG) website for human rights related information. The site’s search function links users directly with news, reports and explanatory information from the State Department, USG agencies and other resources, allowing for easy access to publicly available documents. We provide a one-stop site for researching the USG’s involvement in human rights.
Human Rights Video Project. The Human Rights Video Project was a grant opportunity for public libraries. Supported by a major grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation, the Human Rights Video Project awarded sets of 12 videos on human rights topics to 300 public libraries across the country.
Description: human rights video project logo

Ishay, M. R. (2008). The History of Human Rights From Ancient Times to the Globalization Era With a New Preface. 2nd ed. Berkeley: University of California Press. Click here for more information.
Jaeger, P. T. (2015). Disability, human rights, and social justice: The ongoing struggle for online accessibility and equality. First Monday, 20(9-7), 1.

Jaeger, P. T., et al. (2015). The virtuous circle revisited: Injecting diversity, inclusion, rights, justice, and equity into LIS from education to advocacy. Library Quarterly, 85(2), 150-171.
Jaeger, P. T., Taylor, N.G. , &  Gorham, U. (2015) Libraries, human rights, and social justice: Enabling access and promoting inclusion. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

Jaeger, P.T. and John Carlo Bertot, J.C.“Responsibility Rolls Down: Public Libraries and the Social and Policy Obligations of Ensuring Access to E-government and Government Information,” Public Library Quarterly 30, no. 2 (2011): 91–116.

Jain, V., & Saraf, S. (2013). Empowering the poor with right to information and library services. Library Review, 62(1/2), 47-52.

Jensen, R. (2004/2005). "The Myth of the Neutral Professional." Progressive Librarian v. 24: p. 28-34.
Jensen, K. (2015). A Culture of Empathy. School Library Journal, 61(11), 40-43.
Jimerson, R. C. (Fall/Winter 2007) "Archives for All: Professional Responsibility and Social Justice." The American Archivist v. 70 no. 2: p. 252-81.
Kagan, A. (2008). "An Alternative View on IFLA, Human Rights, and the Social Responsibility of International Librarianship."  IFLA Journal v. 34 no. 3: p. 230-237. The publication of the first book on the development of IFLA´s human rights involvement provides an opportunity to stimulate discussion about that history, with particular reference to the Free Access to Information and Freedom of Expression (FAIFE) core activity. Several case studies (South Africa, Turkey, Israel/Palestine, and Cuba) are evaluated, the work of the IFLA Social Responsibilities Discussion Group is noted, and suggestions are made for the more democratic and effective functioning of FAIFE. Keywords: IFLA; FAIFE; human rights; social responsibility; freedom of expression.
Kahl, C. M., & Davis-Kahl, S. R. (2010). Human Rights Reference Sources: A Critical Annotated Bibliography. Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian, 29(1), 32-64.
Kirkpatrick, A. (2007). Truth and Youth: the First Victims of War - Military Mis-information and the Responsibility of Libraries. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Knuth, R. (2006). Burning Books and Leveling Libraries: Extremist Violence and Cultural Destruction. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood.

Kranich, N. (2001). Libraries and Democracy: The Cornerstones of Liberty. Chicago: American Library Association.
Krashen, S. and Shin, F. (2004). "Summer Reading and the Potential Contribution of the Public Library in Improving Reading for Children in Poverty." Public Library Quarterly v. 23: 99p. 99-109.
Lewis, A. (2008). Questioning Library Neutrality: Essays from Progressive Librarian. Duluth: Library Juice Press.
Librarians and  Human Rights. (2008, blog). Click here for more information.
A Librarian at Every Table-- mailing list a launched 7/8/01. Subscribers as of 1/01/2015 : 776.
Lor, P. J., & Britz, J. (2012). An ethical perspective on political-economic issues in the long-term preservation of digital heritage. Journal Of The American Society For Information Science & Technology, 63(11), 2153-2164.
Lowe, M. (2007). Civil Resistance and People Power: a Web Based Bibliography. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Maddison, Z. V. (2007). Information’s Role in Emerging Democratic Societies: the Case of Indonesia. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Mahoney, J. (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Their Origin, Development, and Significance. Malden, MA; Oxford : Blackwell Publishing.
Maret, S.  (2015). Human Rights Studies Online. Charleston Advisor, 17(1), 34-39.
Massis, B. E. (2012). Access to library materials:a global fundamental service. New Library World, 113(3/4), 218-221.
Masters, S. (2007). Women Living Under Muslim Laws (WLUML). Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Mathiesen, K. (2015), Human rights as a topic and guide for LIS research and practice. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 66: 1305–1322.

Masuku, M. M., & Makwanise, N. K. (2012). Archives, Accountability, Human Rights And Good Governance: Where Is The Nexus?. Mousaion, 30(2), 187-200.
May, L. (2005) Crimes Against Humanity: A Normative Account. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
McCook, K. de la Peña. (2015). Community heart, anchor, and safe haven: Public libraries in Information Services Today. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.
McCook, McCook, K. de la (2014). Librarians as Wikipedians. Progressive Librarian, (42), 61-81.

McCook, K. de la Peña (2007). " Librarians as Advocates for the Human Rights of Immigrants. Progressive Librarian v. 29, Summer: p. 51-54.
McCook, K. de la Peña & Phenix, K. J. (2007). "PublicLibraries and Human Rights." Public Library Quarterly v. 25(1/2).

McCook, K. de la Peña (2005). "Social Justice as a Context for a Career in Librarianship." In Perspectives, Insights and Priorities: 17 Leaders Speak Freely of Librarianship. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.
McCook, K. de la Peña (2004). "Public Libraries and People in Jail." Reference and User services Quarterly v. 43: p. 26-30.

McCook, K. de la Peña (2004). "The Librarian and Human Rights: Protecting Discourse against Repression." Catholic Library World v. 74: p. 23-28.

McCook, K. de la Peña  & Barber, P. (2002). "Public Policy as a Factor Influencing Adult Lifelong Learning, Adult Literacy and Public Libraries." Reference and User Services Quarterly v. 41: p. 66-75.

McCook, K. de la Peña (2002). "Rocks in the Whirlpool: Equity of Access and the American Library Association.” Commissioned for the American Library Association, “Key Action Area: Equity of Access” Web site.

McCook, K. de la Peña,  Ongley, D., & Roy, A. (2002). "Cultural Rresponsiveness, Tolerance and the Alaska Library Community." Pacific Northwest Library Quarterly v. 66: p. 16-19.

McCook, K. de la Peña & Meyer, R. (2001). "Public libraries and comprehensive community initiatives." Public Libraries v. 40: p. 282-288.
McCook, K. de la Peña & Brand, K. (2001). "Community Indicators, Genuine Progress, and the Golden Billion." Reference and User Services Quarterly v. 40: p. 337-340.
McCook, K. de la Peña (2001). "Social Justice, Personalism, and the Practice of Llibrarianship." Catholic Library World v. 72: p. 80-84.

McCook, K. de la Peña (2001). "Poverty, Democracy and Public Libraries.” In N. Kranich (Ed.), Libraries & Democracy: The Cornerstones of Liberty. Chicago: American Library Association Editions, 28-46.

McCook, K. de la Peña (2000). " Ethnic Diversity in Library and Information Science." Library Trends
McCook, K. de la Peña (2000). "Ending the Isolation of Poor People." American Libraries v. 31: p. 45.

McCook, K. de la Peña and Kate Lippincott. (1998). "Rural Poverty Programs: Library Services to Farmworkers." In K. M. Venturella (Ed.), Poor People and Library Services. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland Publishers, 154-164. 

Mehra, B. (2009). A Road Map for Integrating Socially Relevant Research Projects into a Required Library and Information Science Course: From a Service Model to Community Engagement. Service Learning, 142-52.
Mehra, Bharat, and Srinivasan, Ramesh. (2007). "The library-community convergence framework for community action: Libraries as catalysts of social change," Libri: International
Journal of Libraries and Information Services v. 55, September: p. 170-188.

Miller, R. & Bardales, A. (2006). "BetterTogether: The Joint Conference." Library Journal v. 131: 18.
Joint Conference of Librarians of Color as reported in Library Journal: "At a panel, Kathleen de la Peña McCook (Univ. of South Florida, Tampa) reflected on a dearth in cross-organization work. Within ALA, the creation of the various groups-feminist, gay and lesbian, ethnic, and the Social Responsibilities Round Table-"may have divided us up too much," she said. Then she argued that librarianship is human rights work and suggested displays on subjects such as secret detention and rendition, enforced disappearances, the meaning of habeas corpus, and more. She and others encouraged the librarians present to, in McCook's words, "commit to more active involvement in social issues."'
Montgomery, B. P. (1996). "Archiving Human Rights: A Paradigm for Collection Development," Journal of Academic Librarianship v. 22: p. 87-96.
"Occupy Wall Street Librarians Speak Out".by Daniel Norton, Mandy Henk, Betsy Fagin, Jaime Taylor and Zachary Loeb, page 3 Progressive Librarian  (Links to an external site.)Issue no.38-39, Spring 2012.

OHCHR. (1996-2007). The International Bill of Human Rights. The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. Click here for more information.

Parker, S. (2008). IFLA and Human Rights. IFLA Journal, 34(3), 227-228.

Description: Public libraries and social justice
Pateman, J., & Vincent, J. (2010). Public libraries and social justice. Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate.

Phenix, K. J. (2007). "Dignity and Justice for All of Us: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948-2008."  Progressive Librarian v. 30, Winter: p. 1-2.

Phenix, K. J., & McCook, K. (2006). A Commitment to Human Rights - Let’s Honor the Qualities Required of a Librarian Dedicated to Human Rights. Information for Social Change v. 25, Summer.
Phenix, K. J., & McCook, K. (2005). Human Rights and Librarians. Reference and User Services Quarterly v. 45 no. 1: p. 23-26.
Rabina, D., & Drabinski, E.  (2015). Reference Services to Incarcerated People, Part II. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 55(2), 123-131.

Samek, T. (2013). Days of Action. Progressive Librarian, (41), 52-62.
Samek, T.  (2011). Informing Information Ethics. Journal Of Information Ethics, 20(2), 12-14.
Samek, T.(2007) Librarianship and Human Rights: A Twenty-First Century Guide. (Chandos, 2007).
Samek, T. (2006). "Freedom to Read Week: The Strength of Librarianship in a Fragile World." Feliciter v. 52 no. 1: p. 18-19.
Samek, T. (2005). "Ethical Reflection on 21st Century Information Work: An Address to Teachers and Librarians." Progressive Librarian v. 25: p. 43-61.
Samek, T. (2001). Intellectual Freedom and Social Responsibility in American Librarianship, 1967 -1974. Chicago: American Library Association.
Samek, T. (2001). "Library Ethics, Rights, and Values: Provocative Commentary on the Utility of Library Rhetoric." [Canadian Library Association's Code of Ethics and the ALA Library Bill of Rights]. PNLA Quarterly, v. 65 no. 3: 15-17.
Samek, T. (1996). The Library Bill of Rights in the 1960s: One Profession, One Ethic. Library Trends v. 45: p. 50-60.

Shelton, J., & Winkelstein, J. (2014). Librarians and Social Workers: Working Together for Homeless LGBTQ Youth. Young Adult Library Services, 13(1), 20-24.

Stephan P. Edwards and Julie Biando Edwards. "Libraries, Cultural Life, and Community Identity." International Conference on Libraries from a Human Rights Perspective (Links to an external site.) ed. Nabil Alawi (31 March – 2 April 2008), Ramallah Centre for Human Rights Studies: Ramallah, Palestine. Retrieved June 20, 2009.
Sturges, P., & Gastinger, A. (2010). Information Literacy as a Human Right. Libri: International Journal Of Libraries & Information Services, 60(3), 195-202.
Tise, Ellen R.. "IFLA imperatives: expounding access to information." IFLA Journal 37, no. 2 (June 2011): 158-61. 

University of Washington. Human Rights Film Directory.  
United Nations. (1948). Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 

U.S. Dept. of State. HUMANRIGHTS.GOV. U.S. Dept. of State. is the official United States Government (USG) website for human rights related information. The site’s search function links users directly with news, reports and explanatory information from the State Department, USG agencies and other resources, allowing for easy access to publicly available documents. We provide a one-stop site for researching the USG’s involvement in human rights.

Widdersheim, M. M. (2015). Governance, Legitimation, Commons: A Public Sphere Framework and Research Agenda for the Public Library Sector. Libri: International Journal Of Libraries & Information Services, 65(4), 237-245.

Professional Organizations Committed to Diversity and Outreach:
American Library Association. Office for Diversity.
American Library Association. Office for Literacy and Outreach Services.
American Library Association. Social Responsibilities Round Table.
Ethnic and Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table (EMIERT) of the American Library Association.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgendered Round Table (GBLTRT) of the American Library Association.
The Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force (HHPTF), a group within the Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT), was formed in 1996 to help promote and implement Policy 61 (Library Services for Poor People) and to raise awareness of issues related to poverty.
The “Library Services to the Homeless” page provides recommended resources relating to the following four categories:
*Economic, Legal, and Human Rights Issues
*Local Statistics
*Selected Readings for Librarians
*Social Exclusions and Libraries
In addition, the page links to an archive dating back to March 2005 and offers a list of entries by topic.
REFORMA: National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking:
Other Sources:
Human Rights Organizations
American Civil Liberties Union
This organization works to preserve and protect the civil rights delineated in the US Constitution.
Good Search
Good Search is a search engine which donates 50-percent of its revenue to the charities and schools designated by its users.
Human and Constitutional Rights
Their website is administered by the Columbia University Law School Library. It provides a comprehensive array of links to human rights organizations all over the world.
Human Rights Watch
An independent organization dedicated to protecting the human rights of people around the world.
New Tactics in Human Rights
from their page: "The New Tactics in Human Rights Project, led by a diverse group of international organizations, advisors and practitioners, promotes tactical innovation and strategic thinking within the international human rights community."
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
UNESCO promotes international cooperation in education, science, culture and communication. The organization is committed to educating about human rights.
United Nations Office of the High Commisssioner for Human Rights
The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) represents the world's commitment to universal ideals of human dignity. The organization has a unique mandate from the international community to promote and protect all human rights.
US Human Rights Network
This Network provides ways for organizations and individuals working for human rights and social justice to connect with others working on those issues in the US and in other countries. A central premise of the organization is that the US does not provide many of its own residents with the rights it purports to demand of other countries.
Women's Human Rights-net
An organization dedicated to providing information and analysis on women's human rights around the world.

Foundational Sources: Human Rights
Key Documents, in Chronological Order
Vedas (ca. 2000-1000 B.C.E.)
Mahony, William K. (1998). The Artful Universe: An Introduction to the Vedic Religious Imagination. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
Holdrege, Barbara A. (1995). Veda and Torah: Transcending the Textuality of Scripture. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
Analects of Confucius (ca. 479 B.C.E.-221 B.C.E.)
Confucius. (2005). The Analects of Confucius. Stilwell, KS:
The Eight Beatitudes (Appx. AD 30)
from the Sermon on the Mount by Jesus Christ
The Qur’an (ca. 632)
Haleem, M.A.S. Abdel. (2004). The Qur’an: A New Translation by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem. New York: Oxford University Press.
Magna Carta (1215)
Drew, Katherine Fischer. (2004). Magna Carta. Westport, CN: Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc.
Milton’s Areopagitica (1644)
Milton, John. (2004). Areopagitica. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing, LLC.
Locke’s Letter Concerning Tolerance and Second Treatise of Civil Government (1690)
Locke, John. (2004). A Letter Concerning Toleration. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing, Inc.
Locke, John. (2003). The Second Treatise on Civil Government. Wheeling, IL: Harlan Davidson Incorporated.
Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract (1761)
Rousseau, Jean Jacques, et. al. (2006). The Social Contract. New York: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated.
Thomas Paine’s The Rights of Man (1791-92)
Paine, Thomas. (2006). The Rights of Man. Teddington, UK: Echo Library.
Library of Congress. (2006). Declaration of Independence: Primary Documents of American History (Virtual Programs & Services, Library of Congress).
Massachusetts Historical Society. (2006). The Massachusetts Historical Society | The Adams Family Papers.
Yale Law School. (2005). The Avalon Project: Declaration of the Rights of Man – 1789.
Library of Congress.
Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792)
Wollstonecraft, Mary. (2001). A Vindication of the Rights of Women. Madison, WI: Turtleback Books.
Kant’s Perpetual Peace (1797)
Kant, Immanuel. (1996). Perpetual Peace: A Philosophic Essay. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, Ltd.
Robert Owen’s New View of Society (1817)
Owen, Robert. (1991). A New View of Society. Oxford, England: Woodstock Books.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments at Seneca Falls” (1848)
Women's Rights National Historic Park Website.
Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau (1849)
Thoreau, Henry David. (2002). Civil Disobedience. New York: Book Surge, LLC.
John Stuart Mill, On Liberty (1859)
Mill, John Stuart. (2004). On Liberty. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger Publishing, LLC.
Bryant, Louise. (1918). “Chapter IX: The Constituent Assembly – Declaration of the Rights of the Toiling and Exploited People.” Six Months in Red Russia. New York: George H. Doran Company.
International Labour Organization. (2006). About the ILO: Who we are: ILO Constitution.
International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children (1921)
International Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Women and Children. The American Journal of International Law, 18(3), Supplement: Official Documents, 130-137. (1924). [Available through JSTOR]
University of Minnesota. Human Rights Library. (n.d.). Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child of 1924, adopted Sept. 26, 1924, League of Nations O.J. Spec. Supp. 21 at 43 (1924).
Convention to Suppress the Slave Trade and Slavery (1926)
Yale Law School. (1998). The Avalon Project: Convention to Suppress the Slave Trade and Slavery September 25, 1926.
Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. (n.d.). Annual Message to Congress, January 6, 1941, The “Four Freedoms” Speech.
Adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations on December 10, 1948.
Keown, D. Journal of Buddhist Ethics v. 2.
Shiotsu, T.

ALA Policy 61 (Library Services for the Poor)
The American Library Association promotes equal access to information for all persons, and recognizes the urgent need to respond to the increasing number of poor children, adults, and families in America. These people are affected by a combination of limitations, including illiteracy, illness, social isolation, homelessness, hunger, and discrimination, which hamper the effectiveness of traditional library services. Therefore it is crucial that libraries recognize their role in enabling poor people to participate fully in a democratic society, by utilizing a wide variety of available resources and strategies. Concrete programs of training and development are needed to sensitize and prepare library staff to identify poor people's needs and deliver relevant services. And within the American Library Association the coordinating mechanisms of programs and activities dealing with poor people in various divisions, offices, and units should be strengthened, and support for low-income liaison activities should be enhanced.
61.1 Policy Objectives
The American Library Association shall implement these objectives by:

1.   Promoting the removal of all barriers to library and information services, particularly fees and overdue charges.
2.   Promoting the publication, production, purchase, and ready accessibility of print and nonprint materials that honestly address the issues of poverty and homelessness, that deal with poor people in a respectful way, and that are of practical use to low-income patrons.
3.   Promoting full, stable, and ongoing funding for existing legislative programs in support of low-income services and for pro-active library programs that reach beyond traditional service-sites to poor children, adults, and families.
4.   Promoting training opportunities for librarians, in order to teach effective techniques for generating public funding to upgrade library services to poor people.
5.   Promoting the incorporation of low-income programs and services into regular library budgets in all types of libraries, rather than the tendency to support these projects solely with "soft money" like private or federal grants.
6.   Promoting equity in funding adequate library services for poor people in terms of materials, facilities, and equipment.
7.   Promoting supplemental support for library resources for and about low-income populations by urging local, state, and federal governments, and the private sector, to provide adequate funding.
8.   Promoting increased public awareness--through programs, displays, bibliographies, and publicity--of the importance of poverty-related library resources and services in all segments of society.
9.   Promoting the determination of output measures through the encouragement of community needs assessments, giving special emphasis to assessing the needs of low-income people and involving both anti-poverty advocates and poor people themselves in such assessments.
10.Promoting direct representation of poor people and anti-poverty advocates through appointment to local boards and creation of local advisory committees on service to low-income people, such appointments to include library-paid transportation and stipends.
11.Promoting training to sensitize library staff to issues affecting poor people and to attitudinal and other barriers that hinder poor people's use of libraries.
12.Promoting networking and cooperation between libraries and other agencies, organizations, and advocacy groups in order to develop programs and services that effectively reach poor people.
13.Promoting the implementation of an expanded federal low-income housing program, national health insurance, full-employment policy, living minimum wage and welfare payments, affordable day care, and programs likely to reduce, if not eliminate, poverty itself.
14.Promoting among library staff the collection of food and clothing donations, volunteering personal time to anti-poverty activities and contributing money to direct-aid organizations.
15.Promoting related efforts concerning minorities and women, since these groups are disproportionately represented among poor people.

ALA Task Force Member Survey on Policy 61 The Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force, in partnership with the OLOS Subcommittee on Library Services to Poor and Homeless People, reported the findings from the ALA Task Force Member Survey on Policy 61 at the June 2008 ALA Conference. Click here for more information.